DCLXVI ♆

andromeda1023:

thenewenlightenmentage:

Dying Star
Here is an image of the dying star Abell 36. The white-hot, now exposed, core of this once sun-like star shines powerfully in ultraviolet light. Indeed with a surface temperature of 73,000K (the Sun is around 5,500K at the surface) this stellar remnant is *brighter* in eye-ball-invisible UV light. Like a natural “black-light” the UV photons make the outer gases glow- we would not see the beautiful colors of these objects if the central star only emitted visible wavelengths of light. The Sun probably has a white dwarf-to-be in is core. Luckily the outer gases of the Sun shield us from its Earth-sterilizing heart… for now.
Image Credit: ADAM BLOCK/MOUNT LEMMON SKYCENTER/UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

(via
TumbleOn
)

andromeda1023:

thenewenlightenmentage:

Dying Star

Here is an image of the dying star Abell 36. The white-hot, now exposed, core of this once sun-like star shines powerfully in ultraviolet light. Indeed with a surface temperature of 73,000K (the Sun is around 5,500K at the surface) this stellar remnant is *brighter* in eye-ball-invisible UV light. Like a natural “black-light” the UV photons make the outer gases glow- we would not see the beautiful colors of these objects if the central star only emitted visible wavelengths of light. The Sun probably has a white dwarf-to-be in is core. Luckily the outer gases of the Sun shield us from its Earth-sterilizing heart… for now.

Image Credit: ADAM BLOCK/MOUNT LEMMON SKYCENTER/UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

(via
TumbleOn
)

(Source: Wired, via starstuffblog)

mortisia:

Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece was a Greek civilization belonging to a period of Greek history that lasted from the Archaic period of the 8th to 6th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (ca. 600 AD). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages and the Byzantine era. Included in ancient Greece is the period of Classical Greece, which flourished during the 5th to 4th centuries BC. Classical Greece began with the repelling of a Persian invasion by Athenian leadership. Because of conquests by Alexander the Great, Hellenistic civilization flourished from Central Asia to the western end of the Mediterranean Sea. Classical Greek culture, especially philosophy, had a powerful influence on the Roman Empire, which carried a version of it to many parts of the Mediterranean region and Europe, for which reason Classical Greece is generally considered to be the seminal culture which provided the foundation of modern Western culture.The historical period of ancient Greece is unique in world history as the first period attested directly in proper historiography, while earlier ancient history or proto-history is known by much more circumstantial evidence, such as annals or king lists, and pragmatic epigraphy. Herodotus is widely known as the “father of history”: his Histories are eponymous of the entire field. Herodotus was succeeded by authors such as Thucydides, Xenophon, Demosthenes, Plato and Aristotle. 

[source][Cities and towns of ancient Greece][edit]

mucholderthen:

Via estebanvewi

Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey

(Source: yesknopemaybe, via likeaphysicist)

plasmatics-life:

Sunset ~ By Marek Caran

gothamknowledge:

naturegraphics:

ATOMIC SECRETS

Background: This week features a special issue marking the 100th anniversary of X-ray crystallography. The importance of crystallography in modern science cannot be overstated, but it’s not exactly a household term, so if you are not familiar with the topic, here is a fun, short explanatory video by the Guardian.

Design challenge: We decided to create a graphic spread (top image above, and pdf here) that would show the evolution of crystallography over the past century.

The spread was to contain: 1) a timeline of major discoveries and and technological advances; 2) a graphic explaining the basic science behind crystallography; and 3) graphs to show the rise in structural discoveries over the years, and the improvement in resolutions achieved over time.

We started with a few sketches by the editor (second image above).

Design:

The first challenge was to filter through a vast amount of information and establish how much we could fit onto a double-page spread. I outlined a split-page arrangement, with a guide to the number of timeline entries we could have along with pictures, and positioned the intro text with explainer graphic on the left, and the data graphs on the right. These were aligned in the same timescale as the timeline below. This structural alignment of time had to be made clear in the final layout, otherwise it was in danger of being missed behind all the information on page.

Intro illustration (last image above):

Here the challenge was to produce an attractive graphic, that combined the basic experimental set up used in early crystallography experiments, the technical aspects of x-ray interference through crystal structures, and the concept of diffracted x rays then being detected on a screen. We also wanted to include a real x-ray diffraction pattern from the first crystallography experiment. Because of the complex science involved, arranging these elements together took many iterations and revisions.

If you visit the graphic online, you can either download the print spread, or view some of the images as 3D videos.

-Nik Spencer

(PS. The story behind the 100th anniversary cover illustration can be found here.)

Is it coincidental or what, that I’m listening to the new Crystal Method album as I blog about this?